Unlocked (2017): It’s (Out of) A Man, Man, Man’s World

Unlocked-Banner-Poster

I’m sorry I can’t find any official site regarding this movie.

Okay. So when will we ever get bored with action movies with die hard protagonists? Maybe we never will. Name a few, all that JBS: James Bond, Jason Bourne, Jack Bauer (for me, he is eligible to include), Bruce’s John McClane, Jason’s The Transporter, Liam’s Bryan Mills, and the list still opens for suggestions. Now, mention female die hard protagonist character. Angelina’s Lara Croft? Milla’s Project Alice? Maybe, but I find there’s only few female character in the action movies that is hard to be killed, fully skilled as both assassins and agent. The action genre is likely has been told very well in James Brown’s song A Man, Man, Man’s World. This movie, however, is trying to give us a refreshment to that, with offering a female character in this male dominant genre.

You will meet Alice Racine (Noomi Rapace), a former CIA investigator who has retired since she thought she has failed to avoid terrorist attack on Paris and killed several citizens. She is now worked as a social worker for Moslem immigrants in London, still haunted by the tragedy she thought she can restrain. Reluctant to return to her old job, she is encountered by an CIA agent named John Sutter, who asked her to interrogate a messenger they had captured. The messenger, Lateef, is said to have the words from Imam Khaleel (Makram Khoury) that has to be sent to extremist David Mercer (Michael Epp). When Alice receives a phone call from CIA’s Director of Europeans Operation Bob Hunter (John Malkovich), she realizes that she has been recruited by counterfeit agents.

She tries to escape with the messenger, but death seems to follow her everywhere. After the messenger is killed, she runs into her mentor, Eric Lasch (Michael Douglas). Unfortunately, the gangs follows her too and killed Eric, left Alice to decide that she must investigate the motives behind all these. She is helped by MI5 edgy head Emily Knowles (Toni Collette). The movie is getting more and more thrilling until Alice encounters an ex-Marines Jack Alcott (Orlando Bloom). With his Cockney accent, Bloom’s Jack is ruining the whole thrill they have created from the start and the movie is starting to falling into pieces.

As I said before that the movie has potential to give refreshment on the genre that has been long dominated by male characters. Noomi Rapace plays Alice Racine with muscular and full determination we have seen her since her The Girl with The Dragon Tattoo (2009), and Alice Racine can find her own way to be the next die hard character if the script of this movie had been written better. Alice Racine has a solid background story to make her a good agent, but the script is too easy to guess. The other big names helped the story to develop, unless Orlando Bloom’s Jack, but all have little to none character development. John Malkovich’s Hunter and Toni Collette’s Emily are supposed to be kick-ass characters and actually they’re fun to be watched, but they are given to petty script to develop their own character. Even Michael Douglas’ Eric has a potential to be a very good and surprising villain, but they give so little background story on his motives.

Fortunately, the movie has a very good message that sometimes, it is the extremist that made everything’s worse by turn the facts upside down. When the message is actually good, peaceful and kind-hearted, they turn it into a hateful message and create terror against humanity. I like this movie, and as the ending implies, there should be sequels to Alice’s next action. I just hope they’ll make it with better script.

I give this movie 6.2/10.

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